Academic Catalog

Anthropology (ANT)

ANT 100. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. (3 Units)

Examination of the anthropological approach to the study of humans. Explores the concepts of culture, cultural institutions and processes, the evolution of cultural systems, and the application of anthropology to current social problems.

ANT 101. Intro to Biological Anthro. (3 Units)

Examination of human biology. Introduces scientific approaches to genetics and evolution, primate evolution and behavior, evidence from fossil record for human evolution, and biological variation among modern humans, human growth and disease patterns, and human demography.

ANT 102. Ancient Civilizations. (3 Units)

Examination of origins and development of world civilizations. Using evidence from the archaeological record, the written record, the arts, literature, and the sciences, human cultural achievements are examined from the earliest beginnings to the sixteenth century.

ANT 115. Intro To Arch & Phys Anth. (3 Units)

Introduction to archaeological methodology and human biology. Review of fossil evidence for the biological evolution of humans and archaeological evidence for the major stages in cultural development.

ANT 250. Archaeology and Prehistory. (2.7 Units)

ANT 310. Culture & Personality: Psychological Anthropology. (3 Units)

Examination of the human personality within cultural contexts. Topics include personality formation and child-rearing; stress and mental/physical health problems which occur with cultural change; aging, roles and communication among local and worldwide ethnic groups.

ANT 312. Language And Culture. (3 Units)

Analysis of language as an aspect of culture. Relationship between language and culture patterns, dynamics of language and cultural change; the problem of meaning.

ANT 313. Meth & Tech In Arch. (3 Units)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Basic procedures and techniques used by archaeologists to excavate, analyze and interpret prehistoric remains. Field and/or laboratory activities. Variable topics will include field procedures, laboratory procedures or archaeological method and theories. Six hours of activity per week.

ANT 315. Magic & Religion. (3 Units)

A comparative analysis of magico-religious systems in their cultural setting and the role of the supernatural in human societies.

ANT 330. North American Indians. (3 Units)

Comparative study of cultural patterns of selected past and present native peoples of the United States and Canada .

ANT 333. Ancient Peoples Of Mexico. (3 Units)

The history and archaeology of cultures of Central Mexico and Guatemala. Alternating topics include the rise of the Olmecs to the establishment of Teotihuacan and Tenochtitlan and the rise of Izapa to the development of classic and Postclassic Maya Civilization.  Repeatable course with alternate topics.

ANT 334. Mesoamerica Past and Present. (3 Units)

Explores historical and contemporary trends among the diverse cultures of Mexico and Central America from Pre-Columbian era to today. Focus on indigenous peoples and relationships between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples.

ANT 335. Comparative Cultures. (3 Units)

The world's cultural and social diversity from a sociocultural anthropological perspective. Variable topics include regional surveys (North America, South America, Africa, Eurasia) and/or selected themes in the study of culture. Repeatable course with alternate topics.

ANT 336. Comparative Cultures: Culture, Environment and Globalization. (3 Units)

Ethnographic and comparative approach to the study of the diverse cultures of the world. Examines substance patterns and sociopolitical organization of a variety of cultures in the past and present.

ANT 337. Ethnography and Film. (3 Units)

Exploration of crosscultural differences as documented in visual images and texts dealing with three traditional societies, the Yanomami, the Dobe, and the Dugum. Analysis of subsistence and economy, social cohesion and social conflict, world view, and representations of other societies in a world characterized by dramatic cultural changes.

ANT 338. Mainland Southeast Asia. (3 Units)

Anthropology of Mainland Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar [Burma], Thailand, Vietnam) from ancient to modern times. Analysis of how natural and social environments (geography, climate, migration, trade, religion, arts, and state craft) contribute to the region's cultural diversity, commonalities, and change through time.

ANT 339. Mexico and Central America. (3 Units)

Anthropology of Mesoamerica's indigenous cultures. Examines cultural patterns developed in prehispanic and colonial periods, and analyzes how historical factors, environmental conditions, and political and economic environments have influenced contemporary situations for Indian peoples of the region.

ANT 340. Peoples of Ancient Egypt. (3 Units)

Anthropology of ancient Egyptian civilization from its earliest beginnings to the end of the New Kingdom. Ancient monuments, wall paintings, statues, tombs and hieroglyphic writing are examined to gain insight into Egyptian culture and to illuminate the interaction between Egyptians and foreign peoples.

ANT 341. Folklore. (3 Units)

Theory and method in the study and collection of folktales, myths, legends, proverbs, riddles, and other forms of verbal tradition.

ANT 342. South America. (3 Units)

Anthropology of cultural differences expressed by indigenous cultures of South America. Critical analysis of such topics as environment and adaptation, kinship and social structure, social cohesion and social conflict, symbolism and ritual, and representations of other societies in a world characterized by dramatic cultural changes.

ANT 344. Cross-Cult Persp: Aging. (3 Units)

Survey and analysis of cultural influences on the physical and social processes of aging. Examination and comparison of societal roles available to and assumed by older men and women of various cultures.

ANT 345. Medical Anthropology. (3 Units)

Cross-cultural survey of critical problems common to anthropology and health-related fields; cultural ecology of health and pathology, folk medical practices; medical beliefs in relation to other aspects of culture; public health and medical education problems as affected by ethnic culture; effects of acculturation upon mental and physical health.

ANT 346. Anthropology Of Work. (3 Units)

Examination of the significance of work in contemporary societies. Cross-cultural comparisons of workers' life styles. Impact of changing cultural conditions on work patterns.

ANT 348. Society & Automated Tech. (3 Units)

Examination of the ramifications of the installation of automated systems on social and economic conditions of contemporary and future societies. Analyses of culture change issues and the interrelationships between automated technologies and lifestyles.

ANT 349. Anthropology Of The Future. (3 Units)

Examination of newly emerging questions and ideas about the cultural future of humankind. Topics of discussion include the relevance of anthropology to building a Solar System culture, the possibility of extraterrestrial contact, and alternative cultural futures.

ANT 350. Prehistory: Africa & Eurasia. (3 Units)

Examination of the archaeological record of the Old World (Europe, Africa, Asia). Emphasis on the study and critical analysis of excavated materials, processes of culture change, and reconstructions of social patterns. Variable topics will include the prehistory of different culture areas and chronological periods. Repeatable course.

ANT 351. Prehistory of the Americas. (3 Units)

Examination of the archaeological record of the New World (North America, Mesoamerica, and Andean area). Emphasis on critical analysis of excavated materials, processes of culture change, and reconstructions of social patterns. Variable topics will include the prehistory of different culture areas and chronological periods. Repeatable course.

ANT 352. Human Osteology. (3 Units)

Prerequisite: ANT 101 is required. Introduction to human osteology, bone biology and growth, and paleopathology. students will learn differences between human and non-human remains, determine left and right sides of bones, and identifying important skeletal landmarks.

ANT 353. Forensic Anthropology. (3 Units)

Prerequisites: ANT 101 is required. ANT 352 is recommended. Consent of instructor is required. Examines the techniques used to create a biological profile from human skeletal remains. Students will learn the medicolegal implications of using forensic anthropology techniques to solve forensic cases involving human skeletal remains.

ANT 354. Biological Anthropology. (3 Units)

Prerequisites: ANT 101 is required. In depth analysis of the topics and theories in biological anthropology and is meant to be a continuation of ANT 101.

ANT 355. Human Variation. (3 Units)

Prerequisite: ANT 101 is required. Surveys the biological variation within and between human populations, including the basic principles of genetics, evolutionary theory, and the intersection of culture and genetics. Students will use anthropological and biological theories to understand differences between human populations.

ANT 360. Visual Anthropology. (3 Units)

Survey of anthropological approaches to the study of visual/symbolic communication, the use of images for the description and analysis of human behavior, and modes of producing visual ethnographic texts.

ANT 370. Peoples Of The Old World. (3 Units)

A survey of one or more cultural regions of the old World. Specific topics and areas may vary; for example: Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, Middle East, India, Asia, Southeast Asia, Pacific. Repeatable course.

ANT 371. Historical and Cultural Perspectives in Disability Studies. (3 Units)

Theoretical and historical perspectives on issues pertaining to disability studies/research. The course explores cultural concepts of normalcy and disability and reviews ethnographic contexts of disability in a variety of communities in the United States and the world.

ANT 375. Ethnographic Meth & Tech. (3 Units)

Prerequisites: ANT 100 and consent of instructor. Basic methods in the ethnographic study of contemporary communities. Students conduct supervised field work using audiovisual recording and computer techniques to collect and analyze data. Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity (including computer lab) per week.

ANT 388. Anthro Theories Of Behav. (3 Units)

Prerequisite: One course in Anthropology. Historical survey and critical analysis of major schools of anthropological thought employed in explaining sociocultural behavior and phenomena. An integrative examination of current developments, issues and applications of the field of anthropology.

ANT 389. Transmission Of Culture. (3 Units)

Examination of the concept of culture; emphasis on exploration of cross-cultural commonalities and differences in societal responses. Analysis of dynamics of cultural change with reference to ethnic and immigrant groups and institutions in America today. Topics include roles, institutions, educational processes, family interaction and structure of social systems.

ANT 390. Applied Anthropology. (3 Units)

Prerequisite: ANT 100. Course examines the applications of anthropology to the solution of contemporary social problems. The course examines the methods of applied anthropology, the relationship between applied research and theory, and the ethical issues in the practice of anthropology.

ANT 410. Environmental Policy & Planning. (3 Units)

Examination of natural resource policy on local, national, and international levels, across multiple and diverse ecosystems. Emphasis on contemporary management and conservation strategies in the context of social, scientific, environmental, and legal-institutional factors.

ANT 455. People Culture, and the Environment. (3 Units)

Course examines the political and economic aspects of relationships between society and nature, especially with reference to current environmental and human rights issues.

ANT 456. Quantitative Methods for Anthropology. (3 Units)

Prerequisite: MAT 131 is recommended. Provides an overview of the basic principles and techniques for developing a quantitative research design, collecting, and analyzing data, and presenting results. By the end of the course, all students should be proficient in basic statistical analysis in anthropological research.

ANT 490. Proseminar in Anthropology. (3 Units)

Prerequisite:  ANT 100, ANT 101, and ANT 102. Explores careers in Anthropology, examines distinctions between academic and applied Anthropology, reviews career options within sub-fields of Anthropology, examines professional activities of Anthropologists, explains research design.

ANT 494. Independent Study. (1-4 Units)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a particular problem under the direction of a member of the anthropology department. Repeatable course.

ANT 495. Selected Topics In Anthropology. (1-4 Units)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. An intensive study of an issue, concept or theory in anthropology that is of special interest to both the faculty member and the students. Repeatable course. Three hours of lecture per week.

ANT 498S. Directed Research. (1-3 Units)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The student develops and completes an individual study under faculty supervision. Repeatable course.

ANT 510. Environmental Policy and Planning. (3 Units)

Examination of natural resource policy on local, national, and international level, across multiple and diverse ecosystems. Emphasis on contemporary management and conservation strategies in the context of social, scientific, environmental, and legal-institutional factors.

ANT 555. People, Culture and the Environment. (3 Units)

Examines the political and economic aspects of relationships between society and nature, especially with reference to current environmental and human rights issues.

ANT 595. Special Topics in Anthropology. (3 Units)

Course exposes students to cross-cultural approaches to environmental problems and develops environmental problem-solving skills based on the holistic approach of anthropology. Students will examine the political and economic aspects of relationships between society and nature in reference to current environmental and human rights issues.