Academic Catalog

Sociology

Sociology Program Learning Outcomes

College of Natural and Behavioral Sciences
Department of Sociology
Bachelor of Arts
Degree Roadmap
Minor

Sociology
Women's Studies
(For requirements refer to Women's Studies section in catalog)
Certificate
Community Organizing (Undergraduate)
Social Research (Undergraduate)
Social Research (Graduate)
Master of Arts
General Sociology Option
Research Skills Option

Faculty

Undergraduate

Sohaila Shakib, Department Chair
Kara Dellacioppa, Kelin Li, Alexis Sharon McCurn, Joanna Perez, Katy Pinto, Jose Prado, LaTanya Skiffer, Gretal Vera-Rosas
 
Department Office: SBS B-334, (310) 243-3431

Graduate

Katy Pinto, Graduate Program Coordinator

Emeriti Faculty

Faye Arnold, William R. Blischke, Robert M. Christie, Charles Hohm, Fumiko Hosokawa, John C. Quicker, Steve Riskin

Program Description

The study of Sociology offers students the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of social processes and structures, so as to be able to live and work in our diverse global society and to apply the tools of social analysis to a broad range of professional, academic and community situations. The methods and knowledge developed by sociologists reflect the complexity of human organization, social life, inequalities and social justice. The newly emerging patterns of social change continue to alter our life, making the effective applications of social analysis more important than ever before in solving problems of inequalities, human organization and justice at a local and global level.

The department of Sociology at CSUDH is committed to its mission of sociology in service to community. The department is composed of a diverse, innovative and stimulating faculty who teach and pursue research in a variety of areas that are important in today's global societies. The sociology faculty offers undergraduate and graduate programs with several emphasis that respond directly to the needs of today's students. We offer a wide range of opportunities to engage in service learning, applied research and community studies and organizing.

Sociology is a civically engaged department and is formally recognized by the CSU for outstanding work with local communities where Sociology students and faculty engage in service learning, internships and community based research.

Undergraduate majors and minors and graduate students may concentrate their studies in a variety of areas including applied research, community studies, criminology and justice studies, the helping professions and social change in global context. Sociology prepares students for careers in social work, law, criminal justice, government, non-profit and community and international organizations, education, gerontology, medicine, community service, urban planning, politics, business, academia, human resources and applied research.

Undergraduates majoring in sociology may elect to concentrate their studies in any of the areas mentioned above or in an area designed in consultation with faculty to best fit their academic or professional goals. Students majoring in other disciplines or professional programs may tailor a minor in sociology to complement their major field of study. A minor in Sociology complements a wide range of majors, including psychology, political science, computer science, liberal studies, human services, public administration and many others. Graduate students often plan their studies in the context of more specific career and professional goals, or to augment their current professions.

Graduate Studies in Sociology

The department offers an established graduate program leading to the Master of Arts in Sociology. The program is designed to provide all students with a strong foundation in sociological theory and research methodology. The graduate program is designed to allow for a substantial degree of student choice. Students may choose a macro- or micro-based program of study and select from several areas for further specialization or experience. These areas include, but are not restricted to, such concentrations as social research and computer applications; sociology of education; community and clinical sociology; law and society; criminology and deviance; and general sociology. Students are expected to select a major advisor who can best facilitate their specific interests in the program. Finally, students may choose one of the following options to complete their program of graduate study: comprehensive exam, thematic project or thesis. Students with an interest in teaching and administrative applications of the degree are encouraged to complete via examination. Those with research interests or who may wish to pursue advanced graduate study toward a doctoral degree are encouraged to opt for the thesis or thematic project options.

The Department of Sociology has an established record of success in graduate education. Many of the department's graduates have found careers in research, teaching and a wide range of other fields. Special emphasis is placed on practical and policy-relevant research participation by graduate students in the Urban Community Research Center. Students are encouraged to take an active role in the department, the discipline and the wider community. Students may apprentice in one or more of the many advanced forms of social scientific research, including evaluation research, social impact analysis, ethnographic field research, etc. Students who wish to pursue advanced study beyond the M.A. degree may elect to take additional work necessary to acquire the Graduate Certificate in Social Research.

Academic Advisement

Sociology faculty provide advisement for majors, minors and graduate students in sociology, and provide limited general education advisement for sociology majors. Students are advised to meet with a faculty advisor early, in order to take the best advantage of opportunities offered by the Department. Although undergraduates may go to any faculty member for Sociology advising, Professor Peter Aguilera has extended dedicated office hours, which can be identified by contacting the department office. Professor Mo Chatterji also is available for dedicated advising hours. For graduate studies, Dr. Katy Pinto should be contacted. Faculty are available for both daytime and night students. For faculty office hours and general questions, please call the department office at (310) 243-3431.

Preparation

High school students contemplating a major in sociology are encouraged to take the college preparatory courses, including English, mathematics and social sciences. Courses in computers, logic and life science also are recommended.

Students planning to transfer from community college should consult with their counselor or advisor to assure that appropriate lower division courses are completed before the transfer.

Career Possibilities

The Sociology Department's programs are designed to prepare students for graduate study in sociology and for professional positions and careers in a variety of fields in federal, state and local agencies as well as for jobs in private business and non- profit institutions and applied research. Studies in sociology provide good preparation for careers in social work, law, probation and criminology as well as community organizing, labor unions and public service jobs. Students completing a master's degree in sociology can teach at a community college and work toward a Ph.D. A degree in sociology also complements technical and administrative programs by broadening students' understanding of social organizations, social inequalities, social structures, global and local processes and human behavior. Contact the department office to for a list of faculty advisors to help you with your career choices and planning.

Student Internships

Student internships are made available in locations related to the subject areas in the Sociology Department including criminology and justice studies, helping professions, social change in global contexts, social inequalities and applied research and community studies and others where faculty research and professional practice provide such opportunities. Students interested in internships can enroll in the SOC 381 Field Studies in Urban Problems (3) course which is offered in the Fall and Spring semesters. Internships can also be arranged under special circumstances with individual faculty. Interested students should talk with faculty involved in such areas.

Student Organizations

The department has a chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta, International Sociology Honor Society, for students who meet honor society requirements.  There is a Sociology Student Club and a Pre-Law Club.

Graduation with Honors

An undergraduate student may be a candidate for graduation with honors in Sociology by meeting the following criteria:

  1. A minimum of 36 units in residence at CSU Dominguez Hills;
  2. A minimum GPA of at least 3.5 in all courses used to satisfy the upper division requirements in the major;
  3. Recommendation by the Sociology faculty.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree

See the "Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree" in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

Elective Requirements

Completion of elective courses (beyond the requirements listed below) to reach a total of a minimum of 120 units.

General Education Requirements (49 units)

See the "General Education" requirements in the University Catalog or the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education requirements and course offerings.

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement

See the "Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement" in the University Catalog.

Minor Requirements

Single field major, no minor required.

Major Requirements (39 units)

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this degree.

A. Lower Division Required Courses (7 units)

SOC 101 The Individual In Society (3)
    or    
SOC 102 Understanding Social Relationships in a Global Perspective (3)
SOC 220 Analytical Statistics (4)

B. Upper Division Requirements (32 units)
1. Required Courses (14 units)

SOC 305 Methods Of Soc Research (4)
SOC 311 Global Organizations and Social Processes (3)
SOC 340 Social Psychology: Sociological Perspective (3)
SOC 355 Modern Sociological Theories (4)

2. Electives (18 units)

Select six additional upper division courses in sociology with the assistance of an advisor.

Basic Areas of Study

The Sociology Department recommends that each student select an area for the major or minor. At least six elective courses should be taken from that chosen area of study (Upon consultation with an advisor a student may elect to substitute another course for one in his/her specialty).

The basic areas of study are as follows:

  • Applied Research
  • Community Studies
  • Criminology and Justice Studies
  • Helping Professions
  • Social Change in Global Contexts
  • Social Inequalities

Applied Research

The applied research area emphasizes practical skills needed to conduct research projects in diverse social settings. Courses cover such topics as statistical analysis, research methods, feminist methods, program evaluation, and ethnographic data analysis. The goal of the area is to provide students with hands-on research experiences from a sociological perspective. Students will gain many of the technical skills needed to conduct community research, program evaluation, and data analysis projects. These skills are increasingly important in non-profit agencies as well as in large university and private research centers.

Required Courses

SOC 220 Analytical Statistics (4)
SOC 302 Workshop in Social Research (3)
SOC 303 Qualitative Methods (3)
SOC 304 Computer Applications (3)
SOC 305 Methods Of Soc Research (4)
SOC 306 Program Evaluation (3)
SOC 408 Survey Research (3)
SOC 503 Seminar in Ethnographic Analysis in Sociology (3)

Community Studies

The area of community studies uses multiple methodologies to explore social justice issues in diverse communities. It is designed to provide students with an overview of different approaches to the field. Classes address theories of community, issues in community studies, ethics, and data analysis. Many of the classes include practical fieldwork requirements such as internships, service learning, and research with community partners. This area will prepare students for careers in research, program evaluation, social work, non-profit management, urban planning, and public policy among others.

Required Courses

SOC 302 Workshop in Social Research (3)
SOC 306 Program Evaluation (3)
SOC 326 Sociology Of Medicine (3)
SOC 331 Minority Racial and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 334 Women In Society (3)
SOC 335 Social Movements (3)
SOC 340 Social Psychology: Sociological Perspective (3)
SOC 341 Seminar In Small Groups (3)
SOC 362 Gangs and Adolescent Subcultures (3)
SOC 363 Sociology of Alcohol and Other Drug Use (3)
SOC 380 Urban Sociology (3)
SOC 381 Field Studies in Urban Problems (3)
SOC 383 Black Communities: Class, Status and Power (3)
SOC 384 Community Organizing (3)
SOC 503 Seminar in Ethnographic Analysis in Sociology (3)

Criminology and Justice Studies

This area of study utilizes a social scientific lens to examine various institutions associated with the criminal justice system. Specifically, this area explores criminological theories regarding the etiology of crime, juvenile delinquency, ganging, and deviant behavior as they relate to policing, courts, corrections, and laws. The courses will delve into issues such as social inequality and power relations between correctional institutions and communities. With an emphasis on social justice, this area will give students the tools to analyze these topics from feminist, global, and critical race theory perspectives, preparing students for graduate school, law school, or government employment.

Additionally, students educated within a social justice framework are prepared to contribute to the justice professions through evaluation, research, ethical practice, and dedicated service.

Required Courses

SOC 331 Minority Racial and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 362 Gangs and Adolescent Subcultures (3)
SOC 364 Corrections (3)
SOC 365 Deviant Behavior (3)
SOC 367 Sociology Of Law (3)
SOC 368 Criminology (3)
SOC 369 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
SOC 380 Urban Sociology (3)
SOC 381 Field Studies in Urban Problems (3)

Helping Professions

This area of study looks at the social service resources in the community as they link up with diverse populations in society. Community agencies provide social services, mental health services and health services as they interface with ethnic communities, the elderly and families from all walks of life. Understanding the theories of helping and the methods of service delivery become important in assessing the effectiveness of social agencies. Community fieldwork and hands-on experience at agencies provide the student with opportunities to view the function of these agencies and their purpose in serving communities.

Required Courses

SOC 306 Program Evaluation (3)
SOC 316 Sociology Of Adult Life: Aging (3)
SOC 320 The Family (3)
SOC 326 Sociology Of Medicine (3)
SOC 328 Social Agencies: Practice and Power (3)
SOC 363 Sociology of Alcohol and Other Drug Use (3)
SOC 381 Field Studies in Urban Problems (3)
SOC 383 Black Communities: Class, Status and Power (3)
SOC 384 Community Organizing (3)
SOC 386 Sociology of the Helping Professions (3)

Social Change in Global Contexts

This area of study focuses on the relationship between global processes (political, economic, and cultural) and social institutions and communities. Students will develop analytical skills that pertain to the changing social environments on a local, regional, and global level. This area highlights how collective and individual social factors shape and are shaped by the shifting conditions brought about by globalization. The goal of this area is to prepare students for further study in the area of global studies as well as careers in which knowledge of the global dimensions of social life are required. Topics included but are not limited to: the social impact of immigration, the environment, labor issues, race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, human rights, and new forms of citizenship and governance.

Required Courses

SOC 311 Global Organizations and Social Processes (3)
SOC 321 Sociology Of Education (3)
SOC 315 Sociology Of Work (3)
SOC 326 Sociology Of Medicine (3)
SOC 334 Women In Society (3)
SOC 335 Social Movements (3)
SOC 384 Community Organizing (3)
SOC 387 Theory and Research in Globalization (3)

Social Inequalities

This area of study focuses on forms of racial formation, the social construction of gender and inequality, class and domination and subordination. Students will develop the skills to critically understand the intersections of race, class, gender, sexualities, citizenship and inequalities that shape social lives. Furthermore, students will acquire an understanding of resistance and social movements aimed at addressing inequalities. The study of social inequalities prepares students for a wide range of careers where sensitivity to diversity and advocacy are called for.

Required Courses

SOC 311 Global Organizations and Social Processes (3)
SOC 321 Sociology Of Education (3)
SOC 322 Social Environment of Education (3)
SOC 327 Sociology of Sports (3)
SOC 331 Minority Racial and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 334 Women In Society (3)
SOC 335 Social Movements (3)
SOC 362 Gangs and Adolescent Subcultures (3)
SOC 383 Black Communities: Class, Status and Power (3)
SOC 384 Community Organizing (3)

Minor in Sociology (15 units)

Five courses selected upon advisement (a maximum of three lower division units may apply toward the minor). The department also provides advisors who pay particular attention to the professional needs of students working in the technical, administrative and business fields. Minor areas may be "tailor-made" to meet the specific educational interests and career needs of students (see previous academic advisement section).

Certificate in Community Organizing- Undergraduate (15 units)

This certificate examines theories and perspectives on organizing with an emphasis on preparing students to bridge differences and become community leaders for social and gender justice. Inequalities of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, age and citizenship are just some of the differences that shape ways in which organizing is carried out and communities are formed. Through this certificate, students will learn theoretical approaches to organizing and community work and will, through experiential learning in the area of community organizing, apply these theoretical approaches. Furthermore, students are trained in practical aspects of community organizing from managing funds to utilization of technology. An Internships with a community-based organizations in the Los Angeles area will be central to completion of the certificate.

Requirements

A. Required Courses (12 units)

SOC 335 Social Movements (3)
SOC 384 Community Organizing (3)
SOC 496 Internship in Sociology (3-6)

B. Electives (3 units)

Select one elective Sociology course in consultation with an advisor. (3)

Certificate in Social Research- Undergraduate (41 units)

The Undergraduate Certificate in Social Research is designed to qualify recipients to participate fully in all phases of research projects from the initial conceptualization to the final report writing. To qualify for the certificate candidates must demonstrate their competence in conceptualization, research design, sampling design, instrument design, data collection, data analysis and report writing. This program is open to non-sociology majors.

Requirements

A. Required Courses (29 units)

The following required courses may be applied to the major in Sociology (29 units):
SOC 220 Analytical Statistics (4)
SOC 303 Qualitative Methods (3)
SOC 304 Computer Applications (3)
    or    
SOC 307 Micro Computer Data Base Applications in Social Science (3)
SOC 305 Methods Of Soc Research (4)
SOC 355 Modern Sociological Theories (4)
SOC 381 Field Studies in Urban Problems (3)
    or    
SOC 306 Program Evaluation (3)
SOC 401 Inferential Statistics (4)
SOC 402 Multivariate Analysis (4)

B. Urban Community Research Center (12 units)

The following course must be taken in the Urban Community Research Center (12 units):
SOC 302 Workshop in Social Research (3)

Note: Appropriate courses from other disciplines may be substituted with the assistance of an advisor.

Master of Arts in Sociology

Admissions Requirements and Procedures

To be considered for admission to the Sociology Graduate Program, applicants must complete the appropriate forms and pay the established fees through the Office of Admissions. Successful applicants must possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university and a grade point average of 3.0 in the last 60 semester units (90 quarter units) of upper division undergraduate course work (excluding units earned in extension studies). The applicant should have two letters of recommendation forwarded to the program coordinator. Applicants not possessing the above qualifications may apply directly to the Sociology Graduate Committee for special consideration.

Only those applicants who show promise of success and fitness will be admitted to the graduate program, and only those who continue to demonstrate a satisfactory level of scholastic competence and fitness shall be eligible to continue in the program.

Requirements for Classified Standing

To become classified in the Sociology Graduate Program, a student must demonstrate a background in social science theory and methods. This usually entails a theory and a methods course taken at the undergraduate level. Students in need of this exposure will be required to take appropriate undergraduate theory and/or methods course(s) in order to be classified. Students eligible for classification should contact the graduate coordinator.

Requirement for Advancement to Candidacy

Candidacy status denotes the successful completion of a major portion of the graduate academic program.

To be advanced to candidacy students must have completed the following:

1. Meet graduate writing assessment requirement
2. The following core courses with a minimum grade of "B" in each course

SOC 505 Seminar in Sociological Research (3)
SOC 506 Laboratory in Sociological Research (1)
SOC 511 Seminar in Social Organizations (3)
  or    
SOC 550 Seminar in Interaction Processes (3)
SOC 555 Seminar in Sociological Theory (3)

3. Completion of two additional graduate seminars in sociology with a minimum grade point average of 3.0
4. Approval of the student's eligibility for the comprehensive exam by the graduate coordinator; or
5. Approval of a thesis or thematic project proposal by a committee consisting of at least two members of the full-time faculty of the sociology department. Proposals are submitted in writing and the title is registered with the department

Degree Requirements

General Sociology Option (30 units)

1. Required Core Courses (10 units)

SOC 505 Seminar in Sociological Research (3)
SOC 506 Laboratory in Sociological Research (1)
SOC 555 Seminar in Sociological Theory (3)
SOC 511 Seminar in Social Organizations (3)
    or    
SOC 550 Seminar in Interaction Processes (3)

2. Classified students are required to take SOC 505 Seminar in Sociological Research (3) and SOC 555 Seminar in Sociological Theory (3) during their first year in the program
3. 20 additional units from sociology course offerings (a maximum of nine units may be taken from 300 or 400 level courses and only with the consent of the graduate coordinator)
4. Completion of the comprehensive exam, thesis or thematic project
5. Of the 20 units taken under "3", at least three should be graduate seminars, those students selecting the thesis or the project may include five units of SOC 599 Graduate Capstone in Sociology (1-5). Those students selecting the comprehensive examination option must include two units of SOC 599 Graduate Capstone in Sociology (1-5)
6. An overall grade point average of 3.0 or better with no grade lower than a "B" in the core courses

Research Skills Option (30 units)

1. Prerequisites

The following courses are prerequisites and must be completed before classified standing in the program will be granted.
SOC 304 Computer Applications (3)
    or    
SOC 307 Micro Computer Data Base Applications in Social Science (3)
SOC 402 Multivariate Analysis (4)

Research Skills Option: This option will also satisfy requirements for the Graduate Research Certificate.

2. Core Courses (10 units)

SOC 505 Seminar in Sociological Research (3)
SOC 506 Laboratory in Sociological Research (1)
SOC 555 Seminar in Sociological Theory (3)
SOC 511 Seminar in Social Organizations (3)
    or    
SOC 550 Seminar in Interaction Processes (3)

3. Required Courses (20 units)

SOC 503 Seminar in Ethnographic Analysis in Sociology (3)
SOC 502 Graduate Workshop in Research and Theory (3)
    or    
SOC 302 Workshop in Social Research (3)
SOC 598 Directed Research (1-3)

A total of 12 units of SOC 502 Graduate Workshop in Research and Theory (3) and SOC 302 Workshop in Social Research (3) must be taken and at least 9 units must be in SOC 502 Graduate Workshop in Research and Theory (3).)

4. Serve as project director (or co-director) of a selected Urban Community Research Center sponsored project for the minimum of one term and the submission of an approved written report of the project
5. A grade point average of 3.0 or better in graduate study

Master's Requirement

In addition to the major requirements, students must meet all university requirements for the master's degree. Students should consult the section of the catalog entitled "Graduate Degrees and Postbaccalaureate Studies."

Outdated Coursework

Students usually complete the program within two or three years. However, some students do not maintain continuous attendance and, hence, take considerably longer. Students must complete the entire program within seven years. Courses taken in the eighth year are subject to a validation process. According to California State University policy, courses taken more than eight years before the student graduates must be repeated. Consult the general regulations regarding "outdated coursework" elsewhere in the catalog.

Certificate in Social Research - Graduate (32 units)

The Graduate Certificate in Social Research is designed to qualify recipients to supervise researchers in all phases of research projects from the initial conceptualization to the final report writing. To obtain the certificate, candidates must demonstrate their competence to teach and supervise researchers in conceptualization, research design, sampling design, data collection, data analysis and report writing. Note: The student in the certificate program must meet the admission requirements for the Sociology Master's Degree Program and must maintain a 3.0 ("B") average.

Requirements

A. Required Courses (20 units)

The following required courses may be applied to the master of arts degree in Sociology (20 units):
SOC 304 Computer Applications (3)
    or    
SOC 307 Micro Computer Data Base Applications in Social Science (3)
SOC 402 Multivariate Analysis (4)
SOC 503 Seminar in Ethnographic Analysis in Sociology (3)
SOC 505 Seminar in Sociological Research (3)
SOC 506 Laboratory in Sociological Research (1)
SOC 555 Seminar in Sociological Theory (3)
SOC 598 Directed Research (1-3)

B. Urban Community Research Center (12 units)

The following courses must be taken in the Urban Community Research Center (12 units):
SOC 302 Workshop in Social Research (3)
    or    
SOC 502 Graduate Workshop in Research and Theory (3)

Note: Appropriate courses from other disciplines may be substituted with consent of advisor.

Note: A total of 12 units must be taken from B, including at least 9 units of SOC 502 Graduate Workshop in Research and Theory (3).